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Rich Badmington

Rich Badmington

For several years, Rich Badmington served as coordinator of coaching for the 2,600-member Lutherville/Timonium Recreation Council soccer program. In addition to being the father of three soccer-playing children, he is a USSF C-licensed coach and former assistant men’s varsity coach at Columbia University during four years when the team won the Ivy League and participated in the NCAA Division I Final Four. He also served as assistant men’s varsity coach at Dartmouth College. Rich’s understanding of youth coaching, refined over 13 years of coaching his own children, began during his decade-long tenure as a program director and vice president at two of the country’s pioneering soccer camp programs: World Cup Sports, the first company to create a national overnight camp system, and North American Soccer Camps, then the largest provider of day camp programs serving over 25,000 children in 40 states. Rich was an all-conference player and co-captain of the men’s varsity team at the University of New Hampshire. “Power Tools” The building blocks of soccer can be grouped into a series of three basic “progressions,” meaning three, progressively more challenging teaching sequences of related ideas. A fourth progression is offered for Goalkeepers. These are sequences within which ideas are built, from simple to complex; a growing accumulation of information. One idea relates to and serves as a foundation for the next. The teaching of pure technique (the way the body plays the ball) must happen within these activities – not as a preliminary, isolated, static exercise. These progressions are: 1. Winning the ball 2. Advancing the ball 3. Finishing (goal scoring) Given all there is to learn about soccer – the shear volume of information; the countless combinations, sequences, and levels of content; the lifelong learning that is possible; and the infinite variety of children – it is a bewildering exercise to try to suggest “just the right mix” of training activities. These can be suggested but remain for coaches to devise.